C++ Russia
Saint-Petersburg, Russia
April 19-21 2018

27
great speakers
1250
minutes
for experienced
developers

About

C++ Russia with bliny and matryoshkas! With great guests from around the world for two days. The conference is for experienced developers!

Location: Saint Petersburg, Park Inn Pribaltiyskaya Hotel.

So far we held conferences in several cities in Russia: Moscow, Saint-Petersburg, Yekaterinburg, Nizhny Novgorod, Kazan, Tomsk and Saratov. We invite speakers from variety of cities and from other countries as well.

Keynote speaker will be Jon Kalb, the C++ developer with 25-years of expirience.
During that time he was programming with C++ for Amazon, Apple, Dow Chemical, Intuit, Lotus, Microsoft, Netscape, Sun, Yahoo!, and a couple of companies you've never heard about. Jon is the chairman of CppCon and the author of the "C++ Today: The Beast is Back" book.

Talks

21/04/18
Track A
13:45 - 14:45
Dietmar Kühl
Dietmar Kühl
Concept Based Testing

With concepts being added to the next revision of C++ it is expected that new concepts get defined. Each concept defines a set of operations used by generic code. One such use could be a generic test verifying that all parts of a concept are defined and checking generic interactions between a concept’s operations. Ideally, such a test even works with classes only partially modelling a concept to guide the implementation of classes.

This presentation doesn’t use the actual concept extensions but shows how generic tests can be created using features of C++17. For the generic tests the detection idiom and constexpr if are used to determine availability of required operations and gracefully dealing with the abseence of operations. The generic tests should be able to cover basics of classes modelling a concept. Obviously, specific behaviour for classes will still require corresponding tests.

Attendees are expected to be familiar basic C++. However, deep knowledge of template meta programming is not needed.

Slides in pdf

20/04/18
Track A
17:00 - 18:00
Victor Ciura
Victor Ciura
Enough string_view to hang ourselves

Wouldn’t it be nice if we had a standard C++ type to represent strings ? Oh, wait... we do: std::string. Wouldn’t it be nice if we could use that standard type throughout our whole application/project ? Well… we can’t ! Unless we’re writing a console app or a service. But, if we’re writing an app with GUI or interacting with modern OS APIs, chances are that we’ll need to deal with at least one other non-standard C++ string type. Depending on the platform and project, it may be CString from MFC or ATL, Platform::String from WinRT, QString from Qt, wxString from wxWidgets, etc. Oh, let’s not forget our old friend const char*, better yet const wchar_t* for the C family of APIs…

So we ended up with two string types in our codebase. OK, that’s manageable: we stick with std::string for all platform independent code and convert back-and-forth to the other XString when interacting with system APIs or GUI code. We’ll make some unnecessary copies when crossing this bridge and we’ll end up with some funny looking functions juggling two types of strings; but that’s glue code, anyway… right?

It’s a good plan... until our project grows and we accumulate lots of string utilities and algorithms. Do we restrict those algorithmic goodies to std::string ? Do we fallback on the common denominator const char* and lose the type/memory safety of our C++ type ? Is C++17 std::string_view the answer to all our string problems ?

We’ll try to explore our options, together, with a case study on a 15 year old Windows application: Advanced Installer (www.advancedinstaller.com) - an actively developed C++ project, modernized to C++17, thanks to clang-tidy and “Clang Power Tools” (www.clangpowertools.com).

Slides in pdf

21/04/18
Track A
12:45 - 13:45
Ivan Čukić
Ivan Čukić
2020: A void_t odyssey

C++ has always had a powerful meta-programming sub-language which allowed library developers to perform magical feats like static introspection to achieve polymorhpic execution without inheritance. The problem was that the syntax was awkward and unnecessarily verbose which made learning meta-programming a daunting task.

With the recent improvements to the standard, and with the features planned for C++20, meta-programming has become much easier, and meta-programs became easier to understand and reason about.

In this talk, we will present a few modern techniques of meta-programming, with main focus on the magical void_t meta-function.

Slides in pdf

20/04/18
Track D
16:00 - 17:00
Herb Sutter
Herb Sutter
New in C++20: The spaceship operator (operator<=>)

The new operator<=> was recently adopted as a language feature for C++20. In this talk, the designer and author of the <=> proposal gives an overview of the feature, discusses its motivation and design, and walks through examples of how to use it. We give particular emphasis to how the feature makes C++ code cleaner to write and read, faster by avoiding redundant work, and more robust by avoiding several important but subtle pitfalls in the more brittle code we previously had to write by hand without this feature.

20/04/18
Track A
12:45 - 13:45
Arno Schödl
Arno Schödl
From Iterators To Ranges — The Upcoming Evolution Of the Standard Library

Pairs of iterators are ubiquitous throughout the C++ library. It is generally accepted that combining such a pair into a single entity usually termed Range delivers more concise and readable code. Defining the precise semantics of such Range concept proves surprisingly tricky, however. Theoretical considerations conflict with practical ones. Some design goals are mutually incompatible altogether.

20/04/18
Track A
13:45 - 14:45
Jonathan Boccara
Jonathan Boccara
105 STL Algorithms in Less Than an Hour

We are all aware that we should know the STL algorithms. Including them in our designs allows us to make our code more expressive and more robust. And sometimes, in a spectacular way.

But do you know your STL algorithms?

In this talk, you'll see the 105 algorithms that the STL currently has, including those added in C++11 and C++17. But more than just a listing, the point of this talk is to present the different groups of algorithms, the patterns they form in the STL, and how the algorithms relate together.

This kind of big picture is the best way I know to actually remember them all, and constitute a toolbox chock-full of ways to make our code more expressive and more robust.

Slides in pdf

Schedule

Tickets

Great talks, useful workshops.
We also offer an option to attend us online.

Conference ticket

Two days tickets for main program 20-21 April

Workshop

One day intensive course: a lot of practise, personal work. A laptop is required.

Online

You can watch any talk online. The videos will remain available for two months

Social event

A dinner with speakers and some other attendees, 20 April, 8 p.m.

Buy ticket

Buy tickets

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Contacts

Location: Saint Petersburg, Park Inn Pribaltiyskaya Hotel.

If you have any questions,
please ask them via phone or email

+7 (905) 292-77-13